First-time customers get 20% off (this offer valid for first time visit only) LEARN MORE

Anxiety Disorder Essay Example

Anxiety Disorder Free Essay Exapmle

Fear has for decades been described by psychologists as one of the strongest and powerful emotions and has profound effect on the mind and body. It has the power to tell us what do it incase of an emergency. Fear is a natural response to a threat such as examinations, the challenges of taking up a new job or a new date. Anxiety on the other hand describes certain types of fear that mainly deals with threats are likely to happen in the future as opposed to right now. Fear and anxiety and their general effects always last for a short time and then pass. Fear and anxiety in children have been a major concern to psychologists in that unlike adults, children lack the ability to adequately express their levels of fear and anxiety. “This can hold you back from doing things you want or need to do, and affect your health and health problems that are directly based on fear include phobias, panic attacks and anxiety disorders, including obsessive compulsive disorder” (Mantle, Leslie, Parsons, Plenty, and Shaffer, 2006).

To effectively assess the levels of fear and anxiety in children, a number of tools have always been made use. These include the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorder tool. Relevant literature and available research articles on the topic abide in the fact these two tools are very effective in the assessment of the level; of fear and anxiety in children because they have stood up to the scientific tests. According to Mantle, Leslie,Parsons, Plenty, and Shaffer (2006) Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) “possesses high internal consistency, high test-retest reliability and acceptable stability over time”. This has the capacity to provide accurate statistical research results. Stay relevant over the a log period of time especially in cases where the experimental procedure is long and allows for easier re-test of the results. Due to the fact that “young children arecapable of expressing a much wider range of fears(e.g. television programs) than had been assumedearlier” Mantle, Leslie, Parsons, Plenty, and Shaffer (2006), there is need to make use of an effective tool that has the capacity to provide the data of the wide ranges of the fears demonstrated in young children. This remains another critical point as to why the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool has been referred to as a very effective tool in undertaking this assessment.

The ability to provide the relevant ranges in the variations of in the fears expressed by the children gives is the best competitive edge. March, Spence and Donovan (2009) proceed to buttress the fact that Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool “adequately discriminates between normal and clinical samples, has acceptable convergent and discriminant validity and possesses a meaningful factor structure”

In the understanding that the current Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool fall short of “assessing the fearful behavior in the sense of the occurrence of fearful responding in daily life, but rather reflect a negative affective response to the thought of occurrence of specific events” (Muris and Broegen, 2008) . the modern version of the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool has the capacity to examine the frequency of the fearful thoughts that compound the minds of young children. “It is suggested that even when children are asked to rate frequency of fearful thoughts or avoidance behavior, they tend to respond to fear questionnaire items according to their affective response to the image or thought of the stimulus situation rather than their actual fear responses” (Muris and Broegen, 2008).

The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorder (SCARED) tool is the second effective tool in the assessment of the levels of fear and anxiety in children. This fact is buttressed by Muris and Broegen (2008) in stating that “Reviewed literature identified three current and widely used assessment tools for childhood fear and anxiety and the first assessment tool is the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorder (SCARED) tool. This is because the Screen Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorder (SCARED) tool has demonstrated good integrator reliability. It is therefore an effective toll in the assessment of a young person’s perception and therefore is critical in the provision of the relevant data that has the capacity to provide strong and concurrent validity of the results. In addition to the above, this tool provides data for the empirically supported treatment options for the fear and anxiety complications.

The next applicability of this tool is that it is specifically designed to measure the symptoms of AD form both perspectives of the parent and the child (Lyneham, Abbott and Rapee, 2007). This provides the relationship and link between the child and the parent. Furthermore, it has three versions that provide suitability for every type of assessment.

The discussions projected above support the assertion that both the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorder tool are effective tools in the assessment of the levels of fear and anxiety in young children. This is because the psychological traits and characteristics demonstrated by children demand tools that have the capacity to carry out analytical assessments of the indicators of fear and anxiety in young children. In conclusion, it is scientifically true that both the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R) tool and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorder tool remain on top of the list in the assessment of the levels of fear and anxiety in young children.